OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting: A Quick Review

OSHA recordkeeping and reporting requirements appear straightforward, but the devil is in the details.

Now Returning to Our Regularly Scheduled Program…

John in Official 'Fish Red', White and Blue

John is NOT wearing an Official Fish Uniform

Happy July Everyone!

I hope you are all enjoying your summer.  We at Fish Window Cleaning – Los Angeles South Bay are having a terrific one!

Simply put: The weather gets hot and people want clean windows!

Summer is our busiest time of year and our expanding window cleaning team is doing a great job meeting our customers’ needs.

The Window Cleaning business is booming and we are set to break our production record this summer as we clean commercial and residential windows through Labor Day.

A new record is a good reason to miss a few posts, don’t you think?  Go Fish!   

Personal Best

Our Best Summer So Far!

Our busy schedule has consumed my time but I’m now back to my regular schedule and I will continue to write & post every week.

I hope you’ve enjoyed this year’s articles so far.  I’ve just completed my Q3/Q4 Blog Post calendar, there are so many exciting topics to cover!

Please let me know if there are any topics you’d like to see, I’m happy to fit them in the schedule.

Anyway, I’m back at it.

Thank you for your feedback & support!

This Week’s Topic: OSHA Regulations

The #1 topic that I post on “A Clear View Through Clean Windows” is OSHA related.  These posts are generally targeted for those running a window cleaning business or something similar, the #2 topic is safety (something we all relate to).  We must give the public what they want!

Look for more articles on both topics!

Tom Patton - Risk Manager, BBSI

Tom Patton, BBSI

So, let’s get back to it… Here’s a quick reminder of the main OSHA recordkeeping and reporting requirements.

Please let me know if you find this information useful.

Safety is a serious topic and our company, Fish Window Cleaning, adheres to all OSHA regulations.

Today’s OSHA related information is provided by our company’s Risk Manager, Tom Patton.

Tom works for Barrett Business Services, Inc. (BBSI), our Professional Employer Organization (PEO), and helps make sure we receive up-to-date  safety techniques and information, and he monitors us regularly to make sure we follow our safety training program and conform to all OSHA safety regulations.

OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting Requirements

The OSHA recordkeeping standard requires you to keep records of occupational deaths, injuries and illnesses, and make reports to OSHA and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). Small employers (10 or fewer workers) and employers in certain retail, service, finance, real estate or insurance industries are not required to keep these records. However, they must report any occupational fatalities or catastrophes that occur in their workplaces to OSHA, and they must participate in government surveys if they are asked to do so.

OSHA Forms

Cal-OSHA Website

Cal-OSHA Website

The regulations require you to complete three forms:

  • OSHA 300 Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses,
  • OSHA 301 Injury and Illness Incident Report
  • OSHA 300A Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses (annual)

The 300 log must include injuries and illnesses to employees on your payroll as well as to other employees you supervise on a day-to-day basis, such as temporary workers or contractor employees who are subject to daily supervision by your organization.

Work-Related Injuries

Section 1904.5(a) states that “[the employer] must consider an injury or illness to be work-related if an event or exposure in the work environment either caused or contributed to the resulting condition. Work-relatedness is presumed for injuries and illnesses resulting from events or exposures occurring in the work environment….”

Note that the work event or exposure need only be one of the discernible causes of the injury or illness. It doesn’t have to be the sole or predominant cause.

Reporting Work-Related Injuries

Reporting Work-Related Injuries

Section 1904.5(b)(3) says that if it is not obvious whether the precipitating event or exposure occurred in the work environment or elsewhere, you “must evaluate the employee’s work duties and environment to decide whether or not one or more events or exposures in the work environment caused or contributed to the resulting condition or significantly aggravated a pre-existing condition.”

If you decide the case is not work-related, and OSHA subsequently issues a citation for failure to record, OSHA—not you—would have the burden of proving that the injury or illness was work-related.

Recording New Cases

Only new cases are record-able. Work-related injuries and illnesses are considered to be new cases when the employee has never reported similar signs or symptoms before, or when the employee has recovered completely from a previous injury or illness and workplace events or exposures have caused the signs or symptoms to reappear.

Recording Restricted Work

When an injury or illness involves restricted work or job transfer but does not involve death or days away from work, you must record the injury or illness on the OSHA 300 Log by placing a check mark in the space for job transfer or restriction and an entry of the number of restricted or transferred days in the restricted workdays column.

However, you don’t have to record a case where, for example, the employee only experiences minor musculoskeletal discomfort and the doctor says he’s fit to work, but assigns a work restriction to that employee for the purpose of preventing a more serious condition from developing.

Getting Back to Work is Very Important

Getting Back to Work is Very Important

An employee’s work is considered “restricted” when, as a result of a work-related injury or illness:

  • You keep the employee from performing one or more of the routine functions of his or her job (job functions that the employee regularly performs at least once per week), or from working the full workday that he or she would otherwise have been scheduled to work; or
  • A physician or other licensed health care professional recommends that the employee not perform one or more of the routine functions of his or her job, or not work the full workday that he or she would otherwise have been scheduled to worked.

For recordkeeping purposes, an employee’s routine functions are those work activities the employee regularly performs at least once per week.

A recommended work restriction is recordable only if it affects one or more of the employee’s routine job functions. To determine whether this is the case, you must evaluate the restriction in light of the routine functions of the injured or ill employee’s job.

A partial day of work is recorded as a day of job transfer or restriction for recordkeeping purposes, except for the day on which the injury occurred or the illness began.

Count days of job transfer or restriction in the same way you count days away from work. The only difference is that, if you permanently assign the injured or ill employee to a job modified or permanently changed to eliminate the routine functions the employee was restricted from performing, you may stop the day count when the modification or change is permanent. You must count at least 1-day of restricted work or job transfer for such cases.

I hope you found this article “OSHA Recordkeeping and Reporting: Quick Review” helpful.

Remember: Complying with OSHA regulations is important and it’s the Law!

Be Safe Everyone!

_______________________

About the Author

John Gran & Cynthia Julian

John and Cynthia

John Gran (@FishSouthBay) is an entrepreneur and former marketing and product development executive who has grown his successful Fish Window Cleaning franchise in the Los Angeles – South Bay area to become a leading professional in window cleaning services for business owners and home owners.

With his popular blog A Clear View Through Clean Windows, John shares his window cleaning expertise by addressing topics and answering questions that customers continually ask him during his day.  He also uses window cleaning pictures, inspirations and stories about his business to demonstrate the fundamentals for building a strong, healthy, thriving business.

John lives & works with his wife Cynthia in Redondo Beach, CA (she runs the business too!)

If you have a question or would like window cleaning services click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

OSHA Regulation GHS Effective Next Week

A new OSHA law concerning the classification and labeling of chemicals, know as GHS, becomes law effective on May 25th, 2012.

Is that a sexy title or what?

From the feedback I’ve received, many different types of readers follow “A Clear View Through Clean Windows.” For those running a window cleaning business or something similar, I periodically post important safety information.

Please let me know if you find this information useful.

Safety is a serious topic and our company, Fish Window Cleaning, adheres to all OSHA regulations.

Here’s some important OSHA related information from our company’s Risk Manager, Tom Patton.

Tom works for Barrett Business Services, Inc. (BBSI), our Professional Employer Organization (PEO), and helps make sure we receive up-to-date  safety techniques and information, and he monitors us regularly to make sure we follow our safety training program and conform to all OSHA safety regulations.

Make it a SAFE Day!

John Gran – Owner
Fish Window Cleaning – Los Angeles South Bay

Remember:  Safety is everyone’s responsibility!

OSHA GHS Final Rule Effective Next Week

Chemicals must be properly labeled

Chemicals must be properly labeled

The Globally Harmonized System (GHS) finally makes its debut. But don’t worry, there’s plenty of time yet to comply.

OSHA has announced that the final rule for GHS, or Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, will become law effective May 25, 2012.

The effective date of the final rule is 60 days after March 26, the date of the rule’s publication in the Federal Register.

The new GHS rule will be added to OSHA’s existing hazard communication standard, or worker right-to-know law.

OSHA says the GHS rule will help prevent 43 worker fatalities and 585 occupational injuries and illnesses from chemical exposures every year.

According to OSHA, the GHS rule will affect over 5 million workplaces and 40 million workers.

There are two primary groups of employers that will be affected by the GHS rule:

  • 90,000 employers that are chemical manufacturers, importers and distributors
  • 5 million other employers where their employees use, handle, or store chemicals

4-Year Transition Period

Transition Period

4 Year Transition Period

OSHA will allow employers the following phase-in or transition period to comply with the new GHS requirements:

  • December 1, 2013 – All employers that use, handle, store chemicals.  Train employees about the new chemical labels and safety data sheets or SDSs (formally material safety data sheets or MSDSs).
  • June 1, 2015 – Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors Comply with all the requirements of the GHS rule, except compliance with GHS label requirements for distributors by December 1, 2015.
  • December 1, 2015 – Chemical manufacturers, importers, distributors  All shipments of chemical containers must include the GHS-compliant label (signal word, pictogram, hazard statement, and precautionary statement).
  • June 1, 2016 – All employers that use, handle, store chemicals Update alternative workplace labeling and hazard communication program as necessary, and provide additional employee training for newly identified physical or health hazards.

Options During Transition

During the phase-in period, employers would be required to be in compliance with either the existing hazard communication standard or the revised standard with GHS, or both.

OSHA recognizes that hazard communication programs will go through a period of time where labels and SDSs under both standards will be present in the workplace. This will be considered acceptable, and employers are not required to maintain two sets of labels and SDSs for compliance purposes.

What Will Cal-OSHA Do?

Cal-OSHA Website

Cal-OSHA Website

Several of you highly knowledgeable recipients of my newsletter asked me if Cal OSHA will be adopting this Federal Standard.

I can only say this: Cal OSHA must be equal to or better than Fed OSHA Standards and I fully expect Cal OSHA to do the same with this Regulation.

It’s only a matter of time.

With the hazard communication standard already a regular fixture on OSHA’s most frequently cited standards list, it’s more important now than ever before to understand how GHS affects your hazard communication obligations.

It’s important to remember that your hazard communication requirements will not be reduced by the Globally Harmonized System (GHS); they will simply be modified to support the new system.

Though implementing GHS does not involve a total rewrite of the hazcom standard, there are still a lot of changes coming your way. Pretty much everyone who uses hazardous chemicals has some responsibility…but some more than others.

  • Chemical manufacturers and importers have some work to do around re-authoring MSDS and turning them into safety data sheets (SDSs). They also have to rewrite labels and warnings to make them GHS compliant.
  • Resellers and distributors need to get the new SDSs and labels and distribute them to customers.
  • And, of course, employers have plenty to prepare for, too.

Get Ready, Get Set

OSHA Website

OSHA Website

Here are 8 steps your organization can take during the phase-in period to prepare for full compliance with GHS:

  1. Have an hazard communication plan. Maintain a checklist of key plan components and review it annually.
  2. Inventory your on-site chemicals and make sure you have a complete library of MSDSs and SDSs as you get them.
  3. Prepare yourself for the eventual switchover from MSDS to SDS. If you’re still using paper, consider transitioning to electronic system.
  4. Make sure your alternative labeling system is GHS compliant.
  5. Start developing a training plan for your employees now. Have a plan and make sure employees are ready to read GHS compliant SDSs and labels.
  6. Stay current on OSHA, including federal, state and local requirements. Keep an eye on GHS, looking out for key dates that will have an impact on your plan. (Note: That’s where Safety.BLR.com can help. This would be a great time to check it out!)
  7. Request GHS-compliant SDSs from your chemical vendors. Talk to your chemical suppliers and ask about their plans to transition to GHS. Make sure your staff is on the lookout for SDSs with new shipments.
  8. Stay SARA compliant. Update local and state emergency response agencies when new chemical hazard information becomes available.

(SARA is the Superfund Amendments and Re-authorization Act, (SARA) which requires facilities who are subject to OSHA’s hazardous chemical requirements to submit MSDSs or a hazardous chemical list to local and state authorities.)

By following these steps, you’ll be well on your way to preparing for the new requirements.

For Additional Information on GHS:

http://www.osha.gov/dsg/hazcom/ghs.html#1.1

Be Safe Everyone!

_______________________

About the Author

John Gran & Cynthia Julian

John and Cynthia

John Gran (@FishSouthBay) is an entrepreneur and former marketing and product development executive who has grown his successful Fish Window Cleaning franchise in the Los Angeles – South Bay area to become a leading professional in window cleaning services for business owners and home owners.

With his popular blog A Clear View Through Clean Windows, John shares his window cleaning expertise by addressing topics and answering questions that customers continually ask him during his day.  He also uses window cleaning pictures, inspirations and stories about his business to demonstrate the fundamentals for building a strong, healthy, thriving business.

John lives & works with his wife Cynthia in Redondo Beach, CA (she runs the business too!)

If you have a question or would like window cleaning services click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

Mike and Linda receive the Franchise Business Review Top 50 award

Attitude & Aptitude Earn Fish #14 Spot in Top 50 Franchise Award

Fish Window Cleaning is ranked #14 in the Franchise Business Review’s Top 50

Franchise Business Review Top 50 Award

Franchise Business ReviewInternational Franchise Association

Each year, Franchise Business Review (FBR) surveys thousands of franchise owners.  Their goal is to determine how satisfied the franchisees are with their Franchise and then rank and present their findings in their annual Franchisee Satisfaction Awards – known as the  Franchise Business Review Top 50 Awards.

Fish Window Cleaning at IFA Convention

Also in Feb, the Fish Team attended the IWCA Convention in New Orleans, LA

The Top 50 awards are then presented at the annual International Franchise Association (IFA) convention.

This year’s 52nd annual IFA Convention was held February 11 – 14  at the Orlando World Center Marriott.

The convention is attended by hundreds of Franchisers from all over the county.  There is a full agenda of seminars, round tables, exhibitions and networking events and the week culminates at the prestigious awards presentation held towards the end of the convention.

During this year’s Awards Presentation, Fish Window Cleaning was awarded the #14 Ranking in the Franchise Business Reviews Top 50 – Large Class Division. This represents a 16 spot jump from last year.

Congratulations Fish Window Cleaning!

What makes a good Franchisee?

In an interview, Mike Merrick was asked: “What are you looking for in a franchisee?”

Mike Merrick, CEO

Mike Merrick, CEO

I can probably boil it down to two words: Attitude and Aptitude.

You need the right “attitude”, every single day.  It’s the “I will succeed” attitude that drives every successful business owner of every business – not just the window cleaning business.  By “aptitude” I mean you need to have some inherent skills or the ability to learn them.

  1. Goal oriented person. Practically, we want to find franchisees who have a higher comfort level. Someone who easily reaches their comfort level will grow the business until they’ve got a decent income – it’s not hard – and then they’ll level off. We want to find franchisees willing to take the business to the next level. The opportunity is waiting.
  2. Truly service centered. This has been a part of my philosophy from the beginning. It is not lip service to me. It is based in my values from the start of the day to the end. I insist the customer is king. If a customer isn’t pleased, we ask “what will it take to make you happy?”
  3. Sales drive. Once the goal is set and the commitment to service is there, this is a business driven by a determination to hit the street and sell. If you do, you will shine big. The work is there. The money is there. If you don’t regularly sell, you will flop. There is no substitute.
  4. Management Skills.  The ability to manage employees. If you can’t handle employees, you shouldn’t do this business.
  5. Personality. The customer buys your personality while paying for your service. The clean windows consistently come second to the window cleaner. If you aren’t seen as a likeable person, this opportunity may not be for you.
  6. Organized. Our system teaches every aspect of doing this business well. It just needs to be followed. This business can be a disaster to the person lacking organization, intent on doing their own thing.

Mike concluded with a final thought:  “When someone buys a Fish Window Cleaning franchise, one of the most valuable tools they get is over 20 years of my mistakes. If you’re buying our experience, make sure you use it.”

Building a World Class Franchise

Mike Merrick had lost his job as a bank manager when the window washer for the branch said he was interested in selling his business. Merrick looked at the company’s books and was impressed with what he saw–low overhead and virtually no inventory. In 1978, Merrick and his wife, Linda, purchased the company, renamed it, and Fish Window Cleaning was born.

Fish Window Cleaning

The Largest and Most Respected Window Cleaning Company in America

Based on growing demand and his success, he realized there was a need for this service in other markets. Mike used his 20 years of experience to create the Fish Window Cleaning franchise system.

In 1998, the first FISH franchise location was opened in Tampa, FL. Since then, Fish Window Cleaning has grown to more than 220 franchise territories in 40 states. Thirty years later, the company still maintains the traditional Mission Statement and a Core set of Values it was founded on.

Although Fish is now the world’s largest window cleaning company, we will always treat every customer as though they are our only customer.

Why Purchase a Fish Window Cleaning Franchise?

  • In Business Since 1978
  • High Frequency Repeat Business
  • Plan-able Grow
  • Low Start-up Cost
  • High Profit Margin
  • Growing Demand in the Residential & Commercial needs
  • Partnerships with Maid Services, Janitorial Companies, and Contractors & Builders
  • No High Rise!
  • Monday – Friday, daytime hours
  • Proprietary Software – Profitable Routing & Scheduling
  • Unparalleled Franchise Support
  • We teach you to develop a growing business.

Visit our Corporate website at  www.FishWindowCleaning.com for details on purchasing a Fish Window Cleaning Franchise 

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

If you like this post, please click the button to “like” our Facebook Page and follow us!

Please Click to "Like" our Facebook Page

Living Our Company’s Core Values

I wanted to share a prime example why we purchased a Fish Window Cleaning franchise.

Fish = Good People with Shared Values.  

We had a very nice treat the other day, Miles and Jean Roche – Fish Window Cleaning Boulder, CO visited us to talk about our business and enjoy some of our Southern California sunshine.

Miles and Jean Roche

Miles and Jean Roche, Fish Franchisees from Boulder Colorado

We ate lunch at Rock ‘N Fish Restaurant in Manhattan Beach, CA and then walked down to the Manhattan Beach Pier.  My wife Cynthia and I were proud to point out many customers with sparkling clean windows, including: Skechers Shoes #1 (their flagship store), Diane’s Beachwear, Manhattan Beach Post Restaurant, Boy Roy Salon, Pasta Pomodoro Restaurant and many others.

Miles and Jean have owned their franchise  for 10+ years, are great resources for information and excellent examples of successful people – in both their business and private lives.  We love spending time with them and are flattered they chose to spend some of their precious vacation time with us.

Following Miles’ and Jean’s example, we can’t wait to visit Colorado!

An Afternoon Visit… So What?

Fish Window Cleaning is run by good people.

Miles & Jean Roche Visit John Gran & Cynthia Julian in Manhattan Beach, CA

Should sharks be scared of Fish? Yes.

As a franchise, we work closely together to strengthen our Fish Window Cleaning brand and grow our individual companies, and we treat all corporate employees, fellow franchisees and window cleaners like “Fish Family” members.  We are truly there for each other!

Again, most companies say that too…So what’s the big deal?

During our visit, I realized we share a company name, but we also share common values.

Mike Merrick, CEO Fish Window Cleaning

Mike Merrick, CEO

Our CEO, Mike Merrick, has built a company that  “says what it does, and does what it says.

Under Mike’s leadership, we start with a strong mission statement that needs to be accepted before purchasing and running a local franchise.

Franchisees  live in Red States and Blue States, North and South, East and West – but our mission and values are the same.

Fish Window Cleaning Mission Statement

Fish Window Cleaning will dominate the market and be “clearly seen” as the best and most respected window-cleaning company in the world.

We will continue to accomplish this by providing:

  • Superior service to our customers.
  • Unmatched support and partnership with our franchisees.
  • Personal and professional growth to our employees.

Understanding and accepting this mission gets you started, but franchisees must also espouse a set of core values before they can wear a Red Fish Shirt.

Fish Window Cleaning Core Values

  1. Honor God and family.
  2. Honesty – You can believe what we say.
  3. Integrity – We say what we mean.
  4. Commitment – We do what we say.
  5. Promise – We keep our promises.
  6. Available – We are always available.
  7. No excuses – Do it right the first time.
  8. We care and we help.
  9. We succeed.
  10. We have fun.

Who wouldn’t want to own/work for a company that says these things, but also does them?

Well, I do.   And 220+ other franchisees across the country do too!

Fish Window Cleaning Franchisees

220+ Fish Window Cleaning Franchisees

Living our Company’s Core Values

Fish Window Cleaning is run by good, caring, responsible people.

#1 – Honor God and Family

When you use Fish Window Cleaning you can expect friendly, professional, trustworthy service.

#2 to #7 – We expect these from ourselves too. 

Mike Merrick and "FredBird" having fun in St. Louis

Mike Merrick having fun in St. Louis

From our CEO to our newest franchisees, we know putting on a Red Fish Shirt means having 220+ “family members” that are focused on the same purpose and principles.  And there’s strength in numbers.

We talk on the phone, visit each other, hold regional meetings and all get together at our annual convention to train on the latest window cleaning techniques, learn from each other and continually focus our efforts to help each franchise grow and serve its customers better.

We are in this business together, and we want our fellow franchisees to succeed.

#8 We care and we help.

Fish Window Cleaning is the #1 window cleaning company in the United States.

#9 We Succeed.

So, yes, we had a wonderful time with Miles and Jean the other day.  We laughed, shared information and helped each other.   By spending this time together, we also lived our company’s final core value.

#10 – We have Fun.

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

If you like this post, please click the button to “like” our Facebook Page and follow us!

Please Click to "Like" our Facebook Page

OSHA Record Keeping and Posting

OSHA requires businesses to record and post injuries from Feb 1st to April 30th.

Our company, Fish Window Cleaning, adheres to all OSHA regulations.

Here’s some important OSHA related information from our company’s Risk Manager, Tom Patton.

Tom works for Barrett Business Services, Inc. (BBSI), our Professional Employer Organization (PEO), and helps make sure we receive up-to-date  safety techniques and information, and he monitors us regularly to make sure we follow our safety training program and conform to all OSHA safety regulations.

Make it a SAFE Day!

John Gran – Owner
Fish Window Cleaning – Los Angeles South Bay

Remember:  Safety is everyone’s responsibility!

__

Must I keep track of workplace accidents and injuries?

OSHA Website

OSHA Website

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires you to keep records of work-related illnesses and injuries, unless your company employs 10 or fewer workers or you’re in a low-hazard industry (such as retail, service, finance, or real estate).

You must report significant injuries or illnesses diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional, and any other work-related illnesses or injuries if they result in any of the following:

  • Death
  • Days away from work
  • Work restrictions or transfer to another job
  • Medical treatment beyond first aid
  • Loss of consciousness.

Keep in mind that the term “work-related” has been interpreted broadly, so if you’re unsure about whether an illness or injury is work-related, contact OSHA and your HR Professional for clarification.

OSHA LOGS

OSHA Record Keeping Forms 300, 300A and 301

OSHA Record Keeping Forms

OSHA supplies three forms for injury and illness recording:

  • OSHA Form 300 – Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.  This is a calendar-year record of all work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • OSHA Form 300A – Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.   This is an annual summary of all recorded work-related injuries and illnesses. You must post a copy of this summary in a conspicuous place where notices to employees are customarily posted no later than Feb. 1 of the year following the year covered by the records and until April 30.
  • OSHA Form 301 –  Injury and Illness Incident Report.  This is an individual incident report of an employee’s injury or illness on the job.

For official instructions, click here or on the picture to the right, you’ll jump to a PDF of the official OSHA Instructions.

Proper OSHA Reporting Procedures

OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 must be updated within seven calendar days of learning of a recordable incident and retained for five years after the end of the year to which they relate. If there is a change in your company’s ownership or organization, the new management must retain the records.

For certain injuries or illnesses or if an employee voluntarily requests it, you must protect employee privacy. You cannot record the employee’s name on the OSHA Form 300 for such cases and must remove the employee’s name and identifying information from the OSHA Form 301 before releasing it to third parties.

OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 don’t need to be sent to OSHA unless the agency specifically requests them.

If an accident occurs in your workplace that results in one or more fatalities or inpatient hospitalization of three or more employees, however, you must report the accident to OSHA within eight hours of the fatality or hospitalization. Fatal heart attacks must also be reported to the agency.

Some states with OSHA-approved plans might require employers to keep records for the state, even though those employers are within an industry exempted by the federal rule.

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

If you like this post, please click the button to “like” our Facebook Page and follow us!

Please Click to "Like" our Facebook Page