OSHA Record Keeping and Posting

OSHA requires businesses to record and post injuries from Feb 1st to April 30th.

Our company, Fish Window Cleaning, adheres to all OSHA regulations.

Here’s some important OSHA related information from our company’s Risk Manager, Tom Patton.

Tom works for Barrett Business Services, Inc. (BBSI), our Professional Employer Organization (PEO), and helps make sure we receive up-to-date  safety techniques and information, and he monitors us regularly to make sure we follow our safety training program and conform to all OSHA safety regulations.

Make it a SAFE Day!

John Gran – Owner
Fish Window Cleaning – Los Angeles South Bay

Remember:  Safety is everyone’s responsibility!

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Must I keep track of workplace accidents and injuries?

OSHA Website

OSHA Website

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration requires you to keep records of work-related illnesses and injuries, unless your company employs 10 or fewer workers or you’re in a low-hazard industry (such as retail, service, finance, or real estate).

You must report significant injuries or illnesses diagnosed by a physician or other licensed health care professional, and any other work-related illnesses or injuries if they result in any of the following:

  • Death
  • Days away from work
  • Work restrictions or transfer to another job
  • Medical treatment beyond first aid
  • Loss of consciousness.

Keep in mind that the term “work-related” has been interpreted broadly, so if you’re unsure about whether an illness or injury is work-related, contact OSHA and your HR Professional for clarification.

OSHA LOGS

OSHA Record Keeping Forms 300, 300A and 301

OSHA Record Keeping Forms

OSHA supplies three forms for injury and illness recording:

  • OSHA Form 300 – Log of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.  This is a calendar-year record of all work-related injuries and illnesses.
  • OSHA Form 300A – Summary of Work-Related Injuries and Illnesses.   This is an annual summary of all recorded work-related injuries and illnesses. You must post a copy of this summary in a conspicuous place where notices to employees are customarily posted no later than Feb. 1 of the year following the year covered by the records and until April 30.
  • OSHA Form 301 –  Injury and Illness Incident Report.  This is an individual incident report of an employee’s injury or illness on the job.

For official instructions, click here or on the picture to the right, you’ll jump to a PDF of the official OSHA Instructions.

Proper OSHA Reporting Procedures

OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 must be updated within seven calendar days of learning of a recordable incident and retained for five years after the end of the year to which they relate. If there is a change in your company’s ownership or organization, the new management must retain the records.

For certain injuries or illnesses or if an employee voluntarily requests it, you must protect employee privacy. You cannot record the employee’s name on the OSHA Form 300 for such cases and must remove the employee’s name and identifying information from the OSHA Form 301 before releasing it to third parties.

OSHA Forms 300, 300A, and 301 don’t need to be sent to OSHA unless the agency specifically requests them.

If an accident occurs in your workplace that results in one or more fatalities or inpatient hospitalization of three or more employees, however, you must report the accident to OSHA within eight hours of the fatality or hospitalization. Fatal heart attacks must also be reported to the agency.

Some states with OSHA-approved plans might require employers to keep records for the state, even though those employers are within an industry exempted by the federal rule.

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

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You’ve Been Cited by OSHA: What Now?

Here’s some more practical information from our company’s Risk Manager, Tom Patton.

Tom works for Barrett Business Services, Inc. (BBSI), our Professional Employer Organization (PEO), and helps make sure we receive up-to-date  safety techniques and information, and he monitors us regularly to make sure we follow our safety training program and conform to all OSHA safety regulations.

Make it a SAFE Day!

John Gran – Owner
Fish Window Cleaning – Los Angeles South Bay

Remember:  Safety is everyone’s responsibility!

___

You’ve Been Cited: What Now?

If you are cited for violations following an OSHA inspection, there are certain procedures that must be followed. Here’s a brief overview of key issues.

If you receive a Citation and Notification of Penalty from OSHA following an inspection:

  • You must post the citation (or a copy of it) at or near the place where each violation occurred to make employees aware of the hazards to which they may be exposed.
  • The citation must remain posted in a place where employees can see it, for 3 working days or until the violation is corrected, whichever is longer. (Saturdays, Sundays, and federal holidays are not counted as working days.)
  • You must comply with these posting requirements even if you contest the citation.
  • You also have to post the abatement certification documents (e.g., abatement certifications, abatement plans and progress reports) at or near the place where the violation occurred.
  • For moveable equipment found to be in violation and where the posting of violations would be difficult or impractical, you have the option to identify the equipment with a “Warning” tag specified in the abatement verification regulation, http://www.dir.ca.gov/title8/340_4.html
What are your Options?

Empl0yers have Options

Your Options

As an employer who has been cited, you may take either of the following courses of action:

  • If you agree to accept the citation, you must correct the condition by the date set in the citation and pay the penalty, if one is proposed.
  • If you do not agree, you have 15 working days from the date you receive the citation to contest in writing the citation, the proposed penalty, and/or the abatement date.

Informal Conference and Settlement

Before deciding to contest the citation, you may request an informal conference with the OSHA area director within the 15 working day period to discuss any issues related to the citation.

Informal Conference and Settlement

Informal Conference and Settlement

Employee representative(s) have the right to participate in any informal conference or negotiations between the regional administrator or area director and the employer. OSHA will, therefore, inform them of an informal conference or contest.

If you request an informal conference, you can use this opportunity to do any of the following:

  • Obtain a better explanation of the violations cited
  • Obtain a more complete understanding of the specific standards that apply
  • Negotiate and enter into an informal settlement agreement
  • Discuss ways to correct violations
  • Discuss issues concerning proposed penalties
  • Discuss proposed abatement dates
  • Resolve disputed citations and penalties, thereby eliminating the need for the more formal procedures associated with litigation before the Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission
  • Obtain answers to any other questions you may have
You can Contest within 15 Days

Contest a violation within 15 days

Compliance Problems

OSHA encourages you to take advantage of the opportunity to have an informal conference if you foresee any difficulties in complying with any part of the citation. Please note, however, that an informal conference must be held within the 15-working-day Notice of Intent to Contest period and will neither extend the 15-working-day contest period nor take the place of the filing of a written notice if you desire to contest.

If you agree that the cited violations exist, but you have a valid reason for wishing to extend the abatement date(s), you may discuss this with the area director in an informal conference. He or she may issue an amended citation that changes the abatement date prior to the expiration of the 15- working-day period without your filing a Notice of Intent to Contest.

When the Citation Becomes Final

If you do not contest within 15 working days, your citation will become a final order not subject to review by any court or agency. After this occurs, the OSHA area director may continue to provide you with information and assistance on how to abate the hazards cited in your citation, but may not amend or change any citation or penalty, which has become a final order. The area director may only advise you on abatement methods or extend the time you need to abate the violation.

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

If you like this post, please click the button to “like” our Facebook Page and follow us!

Please Click to "Like" our Facebook Page

Josh uses a Harness and Lanyard to safely clean windows

Safely Cleaning High Windows

At Fish Window Cleaning – Safety is our #1 Priority

Josh uses a Harness and Lanyard to safely clean windows

Safety brings a smile to everyone's face!

Pictured: Josh Baymon of Fish Window Cleaning uses a harness and two lanyards to safely clean a home in Rancho Palos Verdes.

What a Clear View!

Fish Window Cleaning adheres to all OSHA safety rules and regulations to ensure the safety of our window cleaners and customers.

Fish also conducts weekly safety training meetings to train, review and discuss all aspects of safety, including personal safety, ladder safety, razor usage, pole safety, heat stroke precautions, etc.

Josh uses a Harness and Lanyard to safely clean windows

We get the high windows...so you don't have to!

Quick Tip:

Ask your window cleaner about their safety training and practices.

Most work-related accidents and injuries can be avoided with proper training and adherence to safety guidelines.

It’s best to avoid accidents BEFORE they happen… consider your window cleaner’s safety practices BEFORE you hire them!

Remember:
Safety is everyone’s responsibility!

__________________________________

 Fish Window Cleaning is a National Franchise with 220+ franchisees located throughout the United States.  FWC corporate headquarters are located in St. Louis, MO.

John Gran and Cynthia Julian own and operate the franchise located in the Los Angeles – South Bay, providing residential and commercial window cleaning, gutter cleaning, chandelier cleaning, pressure washing, and more.

Click Here or Call 310-973-3474 for a Free, on-site written estimate.

If you like this post, please click the button to “like” our Facebook Page and follow us!

Please Click to "Like" our Facebook Page

Fall Protection Tops OSHA’s 2011 Violations List

Reprint: Fall Protection Tops OSHA’s 2011 Violations List

 By Laura Swift

Occupational Health & Safety Online Magazine

November 02, 2011

PHILADELPHIA — OSHA unveiled its top 10 most frequently cited violations during a live presentation yesterday on the expo floor at NSC.

  1. Fall Protection 7,139 violations
    Topped the list this year switching places with last year’s first place holder, Scaffolding. OSHA said 260 workers died in 2010 from falls, which continue to be the leading cause of death in construction.
  2. Scaffolding – 7,069 violations
    OSHA noted that incidents involving this category often result from improper placement and setup of a scaffold.
  3. Hazard Communication – 6,538 violations
    OSHA said most violations involved not having a written Hazard Communication program, a lack of a training program, and a lack of MSDS management system.
  4. Respiratory Protection – 3,944 violations
    Roughly five million workers in the U.S. are required to wear respirators. OSHA said employers must provide workers with proper medical evaluations and fit testing.
  5. Lockout/Tagout – 3,639 violations
    Not following proper Lockout/Tagout procedures can result in unexpected energization of parts and a release of hazardous energy. This standard prevents 50,000 injuries and 120 fatalities a year, OSHA said. A worker spends 24 days away from work to recover from a LOTO injury, the agency noted.
  6. Electrical (Wiring) – 3,584 violations
    Working with electricity involves working on overhead lines, circuit assemblies, cables harnesses, and other equipment.
  7. Powered Industrial Trucks – 3,432 violations
    OSHA said there were 8,410 injuries in the U.S. in 2009 related to forklifts.
  8. Ladders – 3,244 violations
    Ladders make up about 25 percent of falls, OSHA said. Hazards include improper use of side rails, unintended use of ladders, and defective ladders.
  9. Electrical – 2,863 violations
    Many violations involve not following electrical installation requirements.
  10. Machine Guarding – 2,556 violations
    Improper machine guarding can result in broken bones, finger lacerations, and hand crushes. In 2009, 5,930 workers suffered amputations from machine-related incidents.